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Sourcebooks NEXT.

Next Thursday (Thursday, May 30, 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm) I’ll be moderating a panel at Book Expo America entitled: The Future of Ebooks and Ereading.

I’ve invited some of the most knowledgeable people in the field to answer the questions that we really have about our transforming book ecosystem:

Michael Cader: entrepreneur and creator of Publishers Marketplace, Publishers Lunch (the industry’s “daily essential read,” now shared with more than 45,000 publishing people every day), Publishers Launch Conferences (with Michael Shatzkin) and the recently launched, Bookateria.

Jason Merkoski: author of Burning the Page: The eBook Revolution and the Future of Reading. Previously Jason was a development manager, product manager, and the first technology evangelist at Amazon, where he helped to invent technology used in today’s ebooks and was a member of the launch team for each of the first three Kindle devices.

Andrew Savikas: CEO at Safari Books Online. Previously, Andrew led the digital publishing and ebook program and strategy for O’Reilly Media as VP of Digital Initiatives, and was a Program Chair for the Tools of Change for Publishing conference.

Michael Tamblyn: Chief Content Officer at Kobo, responsible for sales, publisher and industry relations, content acquisition, and the merchandising experience across Kobo’s web and mobile services. Prior to joining Kobo, Michael was the founding CEO of the supply chain agency BookNet Canada, where he launched the national sales reporting service BNC SalesData.

It’s an exciting (and very knowledgeable) set of panelists gathering to talk about what comes NEXT for ebooks.

What are YOUR Questions?

The book world is changing rapidly: the rise of eBooks, the advent of self-publishing, consolidation in the publishing industry, and the technological turmoil associated with the digital revolution. We are very much in the middle of the digital transformation of the book. So what does the future hold for ebooks and ereaders? And what are the implications for authors, booksellers, publishers and readers?

What are YOUR questions about the future of ebooks and ereading? Feel free to add your questions to the comments below. Or you can tweet your questions using hashtag: #ebooksfuture.

Looking forward to a GREAT conversation!

With warmest wishes,

Dominique

Comments  

 
0 # Pauloneill 2013-05-28 10:13
Dominique,

Thanks for allowing us to submit questions for your BEA panel. I have several questions that might be interesting to discuss.

1) What markets will be the most likely (my guess is kids) to make ebooks function as a complement to pbooks instead of a substitute, keeping print alive as the hardware market is saturated and digital is in reach for so many just like print? What features are the best way to alleviate the intrinsic push/pull of choosing one or the other, and to sweep the reader into wanting, knowing about, and potentially being entitled (given access to) both?
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0 # Pauloneill 2013-05-28 10:14
2) Where does it stop? What is the "right amount" of social as we move away from speculation and see the tools in our hands? In the advent of capable resources, how do we responsibly deliver a good experience that is more than books but perhaps has more humility than the open web? This is where publishers live IMHO. In content that speaks through tightly crafted experience. Perhaps there is no limit, but most people are still chasing the capabilities and are still running away from print.
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0 # Pauloneill 2013-05-28 10:14
3) How will apps, ebooks and forums cooperate as markets that live together in the reference and education space? Where does one-on-one service (tutoring) fall into it using these platforms' remote resources?
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0 # Jonathan Sharp 2013-05-28 10:15
With talk of ebook sales flattening, is the bloom off the rose? If I'm not already somewhat deep in the ebook business, is it going to be much harder to establish myself as an author, publisher, or service provider now than it would've been 3 years ago?
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0 # Pauloneill 2013-05-28 10:16
4. What should we be demanding that ebook distribution channels (platforms) be delivering publishers as features? Like a petition or something?

Thanks again for letting us submit our questions!
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0 # gregavila 2013-05-28 10:26
Dominique, I would love to see the following question asked to the panel:

Do you believe there is going to be a future for social reading/sharing between readers within ebooks?

With all of the use of social media in today's society does the panel believe that there is going to be a desire by the readers to be able to share and discuss the content directly and interactively within the book with each other? If so, will this be good for bringing the author, and readers closer together or will this just be another distraction in our reading experience?
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0 # Marian Crawford 2013-05-28 12:04
From a reader's perspective, what should we expect for the future of the devices we own? Will reading-only devices be engulfed by tablets and become the vinyl record of books or is there still opportunity to grow with those devices?
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0 # Bill Glass 2013-05-28 15:12
What are the three biggest changes to have taken place in publishing in the past three years in response to digital publishing? New staff? New organizations? New marketing? What?
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0 # Karen Robertson 2013-05-28 15:15
Do you feel that ebooks have changed our reading habits?
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0 # LuizaLC 2013-08-12 10:10
With e-books, apps, and games for children all in the same device, do you think the concept of "book" will change for children? Will they confuse all these things?
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