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Agile Publishing Model.

Futurist David Houle

Welcome to the future!  The future of humanity and the future of publishing.

I am very excited about my new book Entering the Shift Age and the new model of publishing Sourcebooks has created, the Agile Publishing Model (APM). The APM is an innovative platform that allows authors to make their content available faster and in a more flexible format. For example, to suit your needs and interests as readers, Sourcebooks offers a variety of ways to purchase the content of Entering the Shift Age, either in individual parts (“mini eBooks”) or as a whole. (Check out “How to Purchase: The Agile Way”.) You can learn more about the APM by watching the video below.

This is part of the future of publishing. Now let’s turn toward our own future, the future of humanity.

We now live in the Shift Age, a time of transformation that will be regarded by future historians as one of the most significant periods in human history. The Shift Age is one of those inflection points or times when much of humanity will change how we live, how we think, how we interact with each other and what we do.


Entering the Shift Age: Content Review

Chapter Twelve: The Concept of Place Has Changed Forever

The next significant context shaping the Shift Age is the evisceration of the concept of place.

The History of Place

Throughout history, humanity has been deeply connected to the concept of place. We are physical beings, after all, and place is a physical concept, so this makes sense. Place, perhaps more than almost any other idea, has shaped human thinking, behavior, and consciousness.

The concept of place really began to take root when the Agricultural Age began some 10,000 years ago. We stopped moving for food and decided to stay in one place and grow it. This not only initiated a new age, it created the idea that people are of a place and live in that place.

This, of course, ultimately led to the creation of civilization. Every great civilization that quickly comes to mind was developed since the beginning of the Agricultural Age. Civilization was the creation of societies that were place based. Societies in the desert were different than those in the mountains. Those near the Equator were different than those in the northern latitudes.

 

Chapter Eleven: Retrofitting the 20th Century

Another large context by which the Shift Age will be framed relates to how we view, and live with, the effects of the 20th Century.

A Time Lapse Photographic Sequence of Change

It could easily be argued that more change and alteration occurred in the 20th Century than occurred in the prior 150,000 years that modern humanity has lived. The 20th Century, more than any other 100-year period in history, altered the landscape of the planet.

Imagine a theoretical time-lapse photographic sequence where at the beginning of each century since 1000 there was a panoramic photograph taken of the region where you live. Now flip through those images in order. There may or may not have been noticeable change through the first nine photographs through 1800, depending on where you live. But no matter the place, by the tenth photograph, in 1900, there was probably some noticeable change from the prior one.

 

Chapter Ten: The Earth Century

The first large context through which we must view the Shift Age is that the 21st Century is the Earth Century.

Humanity has entered the 21st Century with a rapidly growing awareness that it is having a significant effect on Earth. Environmental awareness, climate change, drought, record heat, and extreme weather are all showing us that something dire is going on with our planet. And there is increasing evidence that we are causing this adverse effect on Earth. This understanding will shape a great deal of the change we will experience in the Shift Age.

A Quick Look Back

Earth Day was first celebrated in 1970. This event, to some degree, was a result of the question Stewart Brand asked in the late 1960s: “Why haven’t we seen a picture of the whole earth?” Then we had the classic “earth rise” photo taken from an Apollo spacecraft in 1968. What we all saw stunned us. There in the midst of infinite blackness was this beautiful blue and green planet we call home. It looked so finite, and indeed fragile, that we understood the name Spaceship Earth. Alone in the midst of infinite space was our home, our only home.

 

Chapter Eleven: Retrofitting the 20th Century

Another large context by which the Shift Age will be framed relates to how we view, and live with, the effects of the 20th Century.

A Time Lapse Photographic Sequence of Change

It could easily be argued that more change and alteration occurred in the 20th Century than occurred in the prior 150,000 years that modern humanity has lived. The 20th Century, more than any other 100-year period in history, altered the landscape of the planet.

Imagine a theoretical time-lapse photographic sequence where at the beginning of each century since 1000 there was a panoramic photograph taken of the region where you live. Now flip through those images in order. There may or may not have been noticeable change through the first nine photographs through 1800, depending on where you live. But no matter the place, by the tenth photograph, in 1900, there was probably some noticeable change from the prior one.

 

Chapter Ten: The Earth Century

The first large context through which we must view the Shift Age is that the 21st Century is the Earth Century.

Humanity has entered the 21st Century with a rapidly growing awareness that it is having a significant effect on Earth. Environmental awareness, climate change, drought, record heat, and extreme weather are all showing us that something dire is going on with our planet. And there is increasing evidence that we are causing this adverse effect on Earth. This understanding will shape a great deal of the change we will experience in the Shift Age.

A Quick Look Back

Earth Day was first celebrated in 1970. This event, to some degree, was a result of the question Stewart Brand asked in the late 1960s: “Why haven’t we seen a picture of the whole earth?” Then we had the classic “earth rise” photo taken from an Apollo spacecraft in 1968. What we all saw stunned us. There in the midst of infinite blackness was this beautiful blue and green planet we call home. It looked so finite, and indeed fragile, that we understood the name Spaceship Earth. Alone in the midst of infinite space was our home, our only home.

 

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